FA053 – Anatomy of Grief, Part 1

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe talk to Jacqueline Lanteigne and Dennis Crawford about the loss of their first infant, Tristan, when he was less than a month old. Next week, Jacqueline and Dennis talk about dealing with their grief about their son’s passing.

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Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

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Career Effects of Gender Stereotypes

StudyingOn a recent episode of Family Anatomy entitled The Anatomy of Gender, Dr. Brian and I discussed our experience with gender roles and some of the implications related to research in this area. An interesting study from the University of Michigan further expands on some of the issues touched upon in our show. Girls and boys have an equal ability to achieve in math and science. However, it is equally clear that their ability to achieve in these areas has not been matched by actual achievement. Men still greatly outnumber women in the fields of math and science. In the research mentioned above, University of Michigan psychologist Dr. Pamela Davis-Kean found that dads play a significant role in determining whether girl’s abilities are translated into women’s engagement and performance in math and science. Her longitudinal study looked at 800 kids over a 13-year period. Dr. Davis-Kean and her colleagues found that girls’ interest in math decreases as their fathers’ gender stereotypes increase, whereas the opposite was found for boys. That is, boys’ interest in math increases along with an increase in their fathers’ gender stereotypes.

Are you aware of how your gender bias may be affecting your children? Are you actively trying to counteract your bias, or are you resigned to the gender differences you perceive? Leave us a comment.

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Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for information only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Living Together, Part 2: Who Needs the "Piece of Paper" Anyway?

Living together has become a more common phenomenon over the past 40 years. While only about half a million people in the U.S. reported living together in 1970, over 4 million people report living together today. Living together has become a very commonplace experience for many people.

Often couples talk about how living together is a good way to transition into marriage. In fact, some see it as a kind of trial marriage. Others reduce the differences between living together and marriage to a “piece of paper”. Given the social and financial pressures brought to bear on couples who get married, it is perhaps not surprising that the differences between these arrangements are seen as trivial to some. However, research has consistently shown that marriage and co-habitation differ in multiple and significant ways.

FA028 – Anatomy of Extracurriculars

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe talk about the benefits of after-school activities, and look into over-scheduling kids. Say it with Dr. G: “CO-curricular!”

Listen here:

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… or get your free subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Don’t forget, you can follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/familyanatomy.

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for information only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

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