High school student sues over Facebook suspension

Wired posted a story today about a Florida student who was suspended after starting a Facebook group that was critical of her English teacher. She is now suing the school over the suspension, claiming that it violates her right to free speech. The lawsuit indicates that the site contained no profanity or threats, yet the suspension alleges that the group was “inappropriate”. The incident was described as cyberbullying against a teacher. The student received a three-day suspension and removed from advanced placement classes. She is demanding that the suspension be removed from her permanent record.

You can read more here.

Subscribe to The Family Anatomy Podcast by clicking here, or get your free subscription directly through iTunes.

FA042 – Anatomy of Brain Health

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe talk about how to keep your brain in shape, especially as you get older. Teach your parents how to download the show!

Listen here:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

… or get your free subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Don’t forget, you can follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/familyanatomy.

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for information only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Play

Partner Abuse, Pt. 4: How are witnesses affected?

Boy on Beach by ColinBrougFor decades, researchers have been aware that child abuse has a severe, long-lasting negative impact on kids. Indirect victims of abuse – the child witnesses – also seem to experience a range of difficulties, including depression, anxiety, aggression, weak social skills, and school-related problems. As I looked over the research for our domestic violence articles this week, I found a disturbing statistic: multiple types of childhood trauma or abuse commonly co-occur, according to Teicher and his colleagues in a study published in the June 2006 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. What are the outcomes for abuse witnesses? And what about kids who are exposed to multiple types of abuse?

It’s well-established that kids who witness severe violence against or harm to their parents can develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. As Dr. Giuseppe wrote on Monday, one third of children who arrive in women’s shelters following domestic violence develop behavioural difficulties. Serious adjustment problems and PTSD have also been linked to witnessing domestic abuse, according to research by Kym Kilpatrick and her colleagues in the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. In fact, in Kilpatrick’s small study, witnessing abuse had as strong an impact on young children as experiencing an abusive act!

Anatomy of Gratitude (Episode 126)

Gratitude
Gratitude

thank you note for every language by woodleywonderworks

As Canadian Thanksgiving approaches, Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discuss gratitude. For centuries, spiritual leaders and philosophers have been aware of the importance of gratitude. In the past 15 to 20 years, the effect of gratitude on mental health has been a topic of discussion among psychologists and other therapists. This week:

  • the development of gratitude in children
  • the social impact of gratitude, in relationships and in communities
  • is gratitude an antidote to aggression?
  • how gratitude affects people who are dealing with depression and anxiety
Listen here:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy blog at Blogger’s Choice!

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Play