Meditation Program Shown to Help with ADHD

In a recent pilot study reported in the online journal Current Issues in Education, researchers found that teaching children the basics of Transcendental Meditation was effective in improving their attention, working memory, organization and behavioural regulation. While most of the children in the study were on medication, the improvements the participants experienced were above those already being obtained from medication. In the study, participants were asked to do T.M. twice a day for 10 minutes over a period of three months. While the study looked at only a small group of children, the researchers are hopeful that the general reduction in anxiety provided by T.M., and perhaps other relaxation programs, can be replicated in larger studies in the future. This study reinforces the need for research into non-pharmaceutical treatments for ADHD and other disorders.

Write us with your experience of ADHD or how meditation or relaxation exercises have helped or hindered your management of symptoms.

You can read more here or  here.

Subscribe to The Family Anatomy Podcast by clicking here, or get your free subscription directly through iTunes.

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for information only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Anatomy of Speech & Language Development (Episode 104)

A baby conversation by Tela Chhe
A baby conversation by Tela Chhe

A baby conversation by Tela Chhe

Season 3 begins with an interview with Kathi Elborn, a Speech & Language Pathologist, about speech problems and language development.

How can parents tell if their child has a speech or language problem?

Wait and see or test right away?

How do speech and language problems affect school progress?

What kind of help is available?

Find out what a SLP thinks on this week’s episode!

Listen here:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

… or right click here to save the episode for later.

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy Podcast at Podcast Alley and for the blog at Blogger’s Choice!

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Play

Be M'EYE Valentine

For most people, Valentine’s day means going out for dinner and sitting across from each other…with no third person distractions. This also means the potential for increased eye contact. Looking into another’s eyes can be a very intimate and/or threatening experience. If you’re having trouble in your relationship, the avoidance of eye contact through dinner will reflect the difficulty of looking at the current truths in your relationship. If, on the other hand, you’re relationship is going well, the opportunity to look into your lover’s eyes will be a welcome part of the intensity and intimacy you’re feeling.

Psychologists have studied eye contact for many years. Recent research from Aberdeen University psychologist, Dr. Ben Jones, suggests that people who make eye contact and smile are more likely to be seen as attractive. Dr. Jones’ study involved having subjects look at a series of photographs and rate the attractiveness of the people in them. Men and women in the study were given flash cards to look at with different facial expressions – making eye contact or not and smiling or not. The results showed the people in photos making eye contact and smiling were rated as more attractive.

You can read more here.

What has your Valentine’s Day experience been like? Was the lack of distractions and opportunity for direct eye contact a welcome expereince reassuring you of your love, or a painful reminder of how poorly things are going? Tell us what you think. Leave us a comment!

Subscribe to The Family Anatomy Podcast by clicking here, or get your free subscription directly through iTunes.

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for information only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Do depressed moms have depressed kids?

IAN HOOTON / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARYDepression can be a debilitating condition, affecting not only mood and outlook, but sleep, appetite, energy levels, and concentration. These symptoms are bad enough for an individual, but for a husband, wife, or parent, they can have ripple effects throughout the home, interfering with relationships and possibly affecting the ability to respond to children’s needs.

When considering the impact of parental mood problems on children, researchers have tended to investigate the impact of maternal depression, and have found links between depressive symptoms in mothers and a number of areas of adjustment for children and adolescents. In a study published in the current issue of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, researchers followed mothers and their children from 1 month after birth until they were 15 years old to investigate the impact of maternal depression on the mood and behaviour of teens. What was unique about this particular study is that maternal symptoms were examined regularly for more than a decade, and the adjustment of the adolescents was reported by the teens themselves.