Three tips for maintaining the parent-teacher relationship

ATL LogoTeachers in the U.K. are concerned that parents are failing their children. In a talk at the annual conference of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, Mary Bousted said that children are arriving at school without being able to dress themselves, use the toilet properly, or eat at the table. Chlidren from various economic backgrounds are beginning school with social and language delays that interfere with classroom learning and behaviour, according to Bousted. And that may not be the biggest problem – a recent survey indicates that 40% of teachers in the U.K. have been confronted by an aggressive parent; this finding suggests that kids are arriving at schools lacking basic skills, and parents blame teachers for the difficulties that result. Other research has shown that positive parent-teacher relationships are related to improved school performance. It seems reasonable to me that parents who don’t respect their child’s teacher might also interfere with the relationship between the teacher and the child as well, which could in turn reduce the child’s willingness to comply with instructions and their motivation to work on difficult assignments.

Anatomy of New Year’s Resolutions (Episode 173)

New Year's Resolutions
New Year's Resolutions

2014 Calendar by Dan Moyle via Flickr

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe talk about how to make and keep New Year’s resolutions, discussing ideas proposed in Time magazine, the Globe and Mail, and the New York Times. Topics include:

  • Are resolutions helpful or harmful?
  • What kinds of resolutions lead to change?
  • What is willpower and how does it work?
  • How can you maximize the odds of successfully keeping your resolutions?

Dr. G’s resolution was to stay in shape, but as we discuss in the show, being specific is important – he actually made a resolution to exercise at least three times per week.

Listen here:

Play

… or right click here to save the episode for later.

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review! Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. You can also vote for The Family Anatomy blog at Blogger’s Choice.

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor. Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discussed kids and families in general in this episode, but every child and family is unique; your experience may vary from that discussed in this episode.

Play

Anatomy of Three Things (Episode 88)

Three ThingsDoctors Brian and Giuseppe talk about three stories from the Family Anatomy website, including:

  1. Do infants who know sign language receive better care at daycare?
  2. Can instant messaging with strangers help teenagers recover from rejection at school?
  3. People don’t recognize their own incompetence.

Listen here:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

… or right click here to save the episode for later!

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!


Website of the WeekWebsite of the Week: The Mother of All Parenting Blogs

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy Podcast at Podcast Alley and for the blog at Blogger’s Choice!

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Play

Is Your Pre-teen Happy With Their Body Image?

Over the past couple of years, parents have been inundated with information about obesity in children. It is now well known that obesity, which used to be a 1 in 10 phenomenon with regard to children, has grown to 1 in 3 in the U.S. and 1 in 4 in Canada. The seriousness of obesity in children is difficult to overstate. One of the areas that researchers have been focusing on is kids’ Body Mass Index (BMI) and how it is associated with a measure of their body satisfaction. The BMI index is a  measure of healthy body weight in relation to a person’s height.

A team of researchers from Harvard University and the University of Alberta, Canada studied over 4000 Canadian school children aged 10 and 11 years. What they found is that girls rated their body image satisfaction higher as they became thinner. With boys, on the other hand, body satisfaction was related to pressures on two-sides. That is, boys’ body image satisfaction reduced if they were too thin or too overweight.