Anatomy of Three Things (FA Retro)

three-things

three-thingsWhile the doctors are on vacation, here’s a vintage Top Three Things that includes a story about summer jobs.

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discuss three stories that were recent when this episode was recorded in 2009:

  1. Should you let your kids win when you play games?
  2. Anti-psychotic meds may be overprescribed for kids without psychotic symptoms.
  3. Summer jobs protect against suicide.

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Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy blog at Blogger’s Choice!

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor. Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discussed kids in general in this episode, but every child is unique; your experience may vary from that discussed in this episode.

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Anatomy of Pain (Episode 160)

The Pain Detective by Dr. Finestone
The Pain Detective by Dr. Finestone

The Pain Detective by Dr. Finestone

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe speak with Dr. Hillel Finestone, author of The Pain Detective, about how stress can affect pain and healing. Topics include:

  • Pain and the mind-body connection
  • Effects of stress on pain, wounds, and healing
  • Pain risk factors
  • What doctors (and patients) should know about pain

Find out all about pain in this week’s show!

Listen here:

Play

… or right click here to save the episode for later.

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy blog at Blogger’s Choice!


Dr. Hillel Finestone: The Pain Detective

Dr. Hillel Finestone

 

Dr. Finestone also conducts research on recovery from stroke. His stroke research interests include 1) nutritional issues, 2) driving, 3) use of virtual reality training and 4) rehabilitation. He recently wrote a book, for health care professionals and laypersons, entitled “The Pain Detective, Every Ache Tells a Story” (published by Praeger ABC-Clio, 2009, Santa Barbara, CA). The book describes, in a clinical case format, the roles that psychological and social factors may play in healing and recovery from a painful musculoskeletal injury.


Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor. Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discussed kids in general in this episode, but every child is unique; your experience may vary from that discussed in this episode.

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FA007 – Anatomy of Happiness

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe talk about happiness, along with factors and strategies that protect from depression.

Listen here:

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… or get your free subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Don’t forget, you can follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/familyanatomy.

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for information only. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Play

Exposure to tobacco smoke and children's behaviour

A study to be published in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics examined the possible impact of exposure to secondhand smoke on children’s behaviour. Although most studies of this kind rely on parents’ reports of smoke exposure, researchers in this case measured it using tests that detect cotinine, a byproduct of nicotine, in the bloodstream. Children were recruited from an asthma intervention trial.

Although girls were exposed to more smoke than boys were, only boys showed a significant increase in behaviour problems. These difficulties included externalizing behaviours (e.g., hyperactivity, aggression) and internalizing problems (e.g., depression). Behaviours were more severe with increasing smoke exposure.

You can read more here.

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