Exposure to tobacco smoke and children's behaviour

A study to be published in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics examined the possible impact of exposure to secondhand smoke on children’s behaviour. Although most studies of this kind rely on parents’ reports of smoke exposure, researchers in this case measured it using tests that detect cotinine, a byproduct of nicotine, in the bloodstream. Children were recruited from an asthma intervention trial.

Although girls were exposed to more smoke than boys were, only boys showed a significant increase in behaviour problems. These difficulties included externalizing behaviours (e.g., hyperactivity, aggression) and internalizing problems (e.g., depression). Behaviours were more severe with increasing smoke exposure.

You can read more here.

Subscribe to The Family Anatomy Podcast by clicking here, or get your free subscription directly through iTunes.

Anatomy of Summer Camp (FA Retro)

Summer Camp
Summer Camp

Camping, Fall 2010 by Jason Meredith (via Flickr)

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discuss summer camps and homesickness.

  • What are the benefits of summer camps for kids?
  • How can parents help their kids to prevent homesickness?
  • How can kids cope with homesickness if it occurs?

Find out what we think this week!

Listen here:

Play

… or right click here to save the episode for later.

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy blog at Blogger’s Choice!

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor. Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discussed kids in general in this episode, but every child is unique; your experience may vary from that discussed in this episode.

Play

Anatomy of Holiday Stress (FA Retro)

Christmas 2007 by Christina Rutz
Christmas 2007 by Christina Rutz

Christmas 2007 by Christina Rutz

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe talk about common sources of stress at this busy time of year, along with some strategies to manage your holiday.

You can listen here:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

… or right click here to save the episode for later.

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy Podcast at Podcast Alley and for the blog at Blogger’s Choice!

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

Play

Partner Abuse, Part 3: Helping Couples Find A Different Way Forward

Researchers and clinicians have worked on the premise that, when it comes to domestic violence, the experience is a one way street. That is, it is primarily a case of mens’ violence against women. Certainly, there are many statistics to back this perception up. For instance, survey’s show that 84% of spousal abuse victims are females, males account for 83% of spouse murderers, and almost one-third of female homicide victims are killed by an intimate partner. However, more recently, researchers have begun to make a distinction between severe violence and mild to moderate spousal violence. The statistics in the mild to moderate cases of violence appear to be much less dependent on gender.

When police statistics are used to determine the nature of domestic violence, the incidents tend to be more severe and as a result, the long understood pattern of mens’ violence towards women is predominant. However, when nationwide surveys are conducted and people are interviewed over the phone, mild to moderate cases, the most common form of relationship violence, show a more evenly distributed representation of men and women as perpetrators. As a result, researchers are beginning to study how to intervene in these less severe cases in order to help prevent an escalation that could potentially prove more damaging to women.