Anatomy of Pain (Episode 160)

The Pain Detective by Dr. Finestone
The Pain Detective by Dr. Finestone

The Pain Detective by Dr. Finestone

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe speak with Dr. Hillel Finestone, author of The Pain Detective, about how stress can affect pain and healing. Topics include:

  • Pain and the mind-body connection
  • Effects of stress on pain, wounds, and healing
  • Pain risk factors
  • What doctors (and patients) should know about pain

Find out all about pain in this week’s show!

Listen here:

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Dr. Hillel Finestone: The Pain Detective

Dr. Hillel Finestone

 

Dr. Finestone also conducts research on recovery from stroke. His stroke research interests include 1) nutritional issues, 2) driving, 3) use of virtual reality training and 4) rehabilitation. He recently wrote a book, for health care professionals and laypersons, entitled “The Pain Detective, Every Ache Tells a Story” (published by Praeger ABC-Clio, 2009, Santa Barbara, CA). The book describes, in a clinical case format, the roles that psychological and social factors may play in healing and recovery from a painful musculoskeletal injury.


Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor. Doctors Brian and Giuseppe discussed kids in general in this episode, but every child is unique; your experience may vary from that discussed in this episode.

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Anatomy of Radical Parenting (Episode 116)

Vanessa Van Petten
Vanessa Van Petten (Radical Parenting)

Vanessa Van Petten

Doctors Brian and Giuseppe talk with Vanessa Van Petten, author of “You’re Grounded!: How to Stop Fighting and Make the Teenage Years Easier” and creator of radicalparenting.com, about parenting teenagers “from the kid’s perspective.”

What do teens want parents to know?

How can families avoid common conflicts and cyclical arguments?

Find out what Vanessa thinks this week!

Listen here:

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… or right click here to save the episode for later.

 

You can also get your free podcast subscription in iTunes. If you use iTunes, you can leave a review!

Positive Parenting Network Spring Fling

Leave us a comment, or you can e-mail suggestions or questions to [email protected]. Vote for The Family Anatomy blog at Blogger’s Choice!

Note: Posts on Family Anatomy are for education only, and are not intended to replace professional or medical advice. If you need to talk to someone about family or mental health issues, you can get a referral from your family doctor.

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The Effects of Stress During Pregnancy: Second of a Series

HeartYesterday, we reviewed the research on the effects of stress on pregnancy. As was mentioned, the results can leave one feeling confused and more stressed! Despite this, there is a general trend in the research that does allow for a some relatively straightforward truths.

The main question is, does stress negatively effect pregnancy? The answer is, yes, if the stress is unusually intense. That is, intensely stressful experiences like the death of a loved one, abuse, or trauma, tend to be associated with premature birth or low birth weight. These outcomes have, in turn, been linked to difficulties later in life for some children (e.g., learning disabilities). However, it is also true that these types of experiences are difficult to avoid. Given this fact, it begs the question, what benefit is gained from knowing that intense stress can negatively effect your pregnancy? While we cannot control traumatic events in our life, we can turn to resources both internal and external in response to these stressors. Stress reduction techniques are within our control and have been proven to be effective.

The answer to our question also leads us to another common wisdom gleaned from the research. If you are pregnant and are under low or moderate levels of stress,  there is no need to worry – it will only make you more stressed! Pregnancy, by its very nature, typically brings with it low to moderate levels of stress. And rightly so. For the majority of us who live in a modern urban atmosphere where we feel as though life is within our control, watching nature take over our body to produce life can be anxiety provoking. Miscarriages, morning sickness, birth complications, childbirth, and birth defects, are just some of the fears expecting parents have to deal with. If these very common stressors were the cause of significant pregnancy complications then nearly everyone could expect negative consequences. Fortunately, this is not the case. While the average stress that accompanies pregnancy need not, in and of itself, be a source of worry, dealing with this stress will make for a more pleasant and rewarding pregnancy. Therefore, here again, stress reduction techniques are recommended.

Making chores fun: Essential strategies for parents

Start 'Em Young by Randen Pederson
Start 'Em Young by Randen Pederson

Start 'Em Young by Randen Pederson

For kids, chores might as well be torture, but it’s often through chores that children first learn responsibility and accountability.  Dr. Martin Rossman at the University of Minnesota, in his study of childhood development, concluded that one of the most reliable indicators of a child’s later success in adulthood—use of drugs, excellence in education, and quality of relationships—was his or her dedication to chores by age 3 or 4.  Those children who did not partake in chores or had none at all were more likely to have poorer experiences in the aforementioned categories.

This does not mean that your child, who may be older than 3 or 4 and have no chores to do at home, will lead an unfulfilling life, but the sooner you start your kids on chores, the better.  Still, forcing children to do things they don’t want to do will only make them feel disrespected, powerless, and indignant—a recipe for unmet expectations.  Chores can be something to make kids feel empowered, helpful, and excited.  Here’s how.